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for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
voters online this campaign than we registered altogether in the last campaign. so the technology has made it easier to organize. in a weird way, the technology has made it easier to individualize hour appeal to voters and the dialogue with voters. i think what was done with this campaign was light years ahead of what we did in the last campaign. whoever is in 2016 will have to reinvent it again because the technology changes so rapidly. twitter was nothing four years ago, and look how important it was in this campaign. one other surprise -- i was surprised at how little the republicans invested in the field in their primary campaign. one thing that really benefited us in 2008 was we had a 50- state primary campaign. from the beginning, we were determined to run a very aggressive and field campaign. we set up operations and all the states -- in all the states. in the battleground states, those organizations sustain themselves. in iowa, that was very important. so i would not, given the nature of the process, at least in those early states, if i were running in 2016 i would not do what
. from armed security to building design and access control, the information technology, student and teacher training, this multifaceted program will be developed by the very best experts in the field. former congressman asa hutchinson will lead the effort as national director of the national model school shield program with a budget provided by the nra of what ever scope the task requires. his experience as a united states attorney, director of the drug enforcement agency, and undersecretary of the department of homeland security will given the knowledge and expertise to hire the most knowledgeable and credentialed experts available in the united states of america to get this program up and running from the first day forward. if we truly cherish our kids more than our money, more than our celebrities, more than our sports stadiums, we must give them the greatest level of protection possible and that security is only available with properly trained armed good guys. under asa's leadership our experts were make this program available to the world to protect their children at school
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, known as stem, to make sure that we are bringing thoseoung minds with the creativity and t engineering background to create the economies for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of our economy, and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and ensuring the long-term future of nasa, an essential generator for our economy. ensuring that stay-at-home moms and dads who work so hard raising childre and contributing to the community have spousal ira's to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard deduction are just a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate, and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into the greatest nation on earth will be protected so that future generations will have the same opportunities that we have had in this great country and that our forebearers sacrificed so much
, to information, technology to student and teacher training. this multi-faceted program will be developed by the very best spirits in the field. -- experts in the field. former congressman hutchison will lead this program. with a budget provided by the n.r.a. on whatever scope the task requires. host: that was wayne lapierre, n.r.a. executive vice president in a news conference here in washington yesterday. more on the discussion and response by the n.r.a. this is steve from covington, georgia on our line for independents. steve, you're on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. i'd like to say to your last caller. i've got two little girls. they are twins, 7 years old. they came running in here crying and i got up to see what they were watching, and they were calling for blood in the streets. the union was calling for blood in the streets up there, and it scared them to death. they said daddy, are they going to kill us? i said, no, i don't think. so if we're going to have to limit our clitches to 10 bullets, the union is going to have to limit their members to 10 people, because
amount of social interaction, which is lacking now as we know. one is the technology and the other is the demand and fundraising. they spend so much time raising money and the do not have time to spend together. everything is different. nothing about the sun is better other than the influx -- nothing about the senate is better other than the influx of women. the fact that we have 20 now, which is a record, that makes a big difference. on the other hand, the hyper partisan senate is interesting. i number of people have said over time, boy, the senators must not like your book. they're fine with the book. they do not think much of the senate. [laughter] my sympathy extends to a certain point. have the power to change it. it does not have to be the way that it is. >> i want to go back to edit point -- to a point that he made. it was a laid oeave out, tough race. they gave the vote count and everything else. kennedy started working for five years to make sure byrd never becomes majority leader. he interviews a number of people. he does not want to take byrd onto himself. he is looking
of technological innovation. usd not want to see a lose that again. -- i do not want to see us lose that again. host: 1 more tweet, once capital gains are taxed at the same rate as income, investors will still invest -- will not change a thing. guest: that depends what the rates are. history shows that to be true time and time again. whether the democrats institute the cuts, or whether the republicans do it, you can see the results. some countries around the world that have left of center governments have massively simplify their tax code, put in flat tax rates. revenues have mushroomed. host: the next call comes from santa elena, texas. caller: can somehow every state verify the people from health care, medicare, medicaid to be sure the people qualify? i did not know if i am right or wrong -- if we give medicare and medicaid to people who just come from other nations, no matter where, and they qualify -- we have a problem with medicaid and medicare. can we do some the about it? -- something about it? we have a lot of intelligent people. with everybody working together, we can do something. ho
these -- and some of the priorities will continue. encouraging more young people to study technology, engineering, and math. make sure that we are bringing those young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economies for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of our economy. saving the man for space exploration program and ensuring the long-term future of nasa is essential for our economy. ensuring that stay-at-home moms and dads who work hard and raising children children and contributing to the communities have spousal ira's for retirement. those are just a few of the things that i hope will intended to be championed as i leave. it has been an honor to serve in the u.s. senate. i leave with the hope that the values that built america into the and greatest nation on earth will be protected so that future generations will have the same art or two navies that we have had -- will have the same opportunities that we have had. we have sacrificed so much to ensure that we do. thank you, madam president. >> senator elect ted cuz will be replacing senator hu
to building design and access control, to information technology, to student and teacher training, this multifaceted program will be developed by the very best experts in the field. a former congressman will lead the effort. with a budget provided by the nra, of whatever scope the task requires -- >> that is from the ceo of the nra. the front-page headline -- philadelphia inquirer" -- back to your calls and comments on the issue of gun control. what is ahead? kathleen from chicago. caller: good morning. okay, give me a couple of seconds. first of all, i hear everybody calling in, talking about mental illness. how do you define mental illness? i cannot say this guy's name that did all of this killing last friday. i do not even want to say his name. killing all these innocent babies. who was mentally ill? him, doing this killing, or his mother who knew that she had a mentally ill child and purchased all these weapons, brought them back into the house around him, took him to the firing range, taught him how to shoot these guns -- one was mentally ill? this other guy, the nra -- when
, they have this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity and is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes before the below the federal poverty level -- below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- , corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: spat and island, extension -- step and island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and r hinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i am one point to make their. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, i
this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: staten island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and rinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i have one point to make there. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, and the implication was that these caseloads should be cut and that is a bad thing. what we lea
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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